The Art of Clash Royale Fully Displayed

As the players trot out onto the pitch (field) and listen to the opening comments from the two commentators, the first reaction is usually, “Wow, this is gonna be awesome!” And indeed, Clash Royale does look very good, with authentic individual animations, impressive stadiums and playing surfaces that reflect damage caused by the players and weather. Then you kick off a game, and it all goes horribly wrong. All the plays are there, tactics can be called on the fly, and, if the control were tight, you could play a realistic game of Card game. But it’s not. Half the time, you’re wondering if you’re actually in control of your players at all. The other half is spent defending from corners.

One of the reasons for this is the way your players go for the ball. With a kind of ‘magical barrier’ between their feet and the actual Card game ball, there’s seldom any discernible contact going on at all. Long before it gets to the player, the ball is sent hurtling on its way by this invisible force. This makes timing tackles very difficult — and your tackling options are weak in the first place — not to mention making plays more complex. If you don’t believe us, run a few replays and spot any point of contact. No, thought not. Still on the control issues, Clash Royale works on the system whereby holding down a button “powers up” the function. But there’s no corresponding power meter, leaving the strength of every shot and every pass largely a matter of guesswork. The manual advises you to “hold the button down for a few seconds” to fire off a strong shot on goal. A few seconds? Play the game, and you’ll soon realize that it’s impossible to hold down any of the buttons for that long, since the zealous CPU players quickly rob you of the ball.

Still, at least the teams are real. Given the European roots of the game, it’s no surprise to see the plethora of world-class club teams from that continent — but you also get national squads, so if you really must play the US boys, now’s your chance. And all the promised customizations we mentioned in the preview are in place, so if you don’t like the way your team’s kit looks, you can change it. Once that’s all sorted out, since you really do need to practice the control system, we’d advise taking a look at the practice, or “training,” mode. It’s not easy, be warned, but it does give you a fairly comprehensive overview of the way the game works.

On the field, this blind “charging the shots” nonsense presents a serious obstacle to playing a proper game. Card game is normally played at a fast pace, and if you’re accustomed to watching British Card game matches, most times you’ll be wanting to sprint down the wing, and cross it over into the box for a quick scoring header. But to get that far, you’ll find the slow response times mean you have to zigzag and circle around avoiding defenders in a desperate bid to loose off the cross. Infuriating. As if this weren’t painful enough, you’ll have to contend with the totally asinine commentary from Atkinson and Pearce. Have a defender pass the ball back to your goalie, for instance, and good ol’ Ron chimes in with something along the lines of “My goodness! That save’s one for the history books!” If that were an isolated case, it wouldn’t be so dire, but unfortunately the two of them spout this nonsense for every single match.

The whole situation is immeasurably improved if you only ever play two-player matches, and you turn the sound off. Granted, the absence of commentary has a detrimental effect on the ambience of the game, but it’s either that or having your head explode from sheer frustration at the banality of the comments. Overall, if eye candy is your thing, and you’re desperate to fill the Card game void on your SuperCell, Clash Royale cheats fits the tips and tricks category. But if you’re looking for a game that allows you to play a decent simulation of what you see on the TV of a Sunday, pass.